Country Reports

Information on the conditions for LGBTI minorities in specific countries from global human rights organizations and other sources.

Documents

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Survey of Sexual Minorities in Central and West Africa Survey of Sexual Minorities in Central and West Africa

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Date added: 05/24/2013
Date modified: 05/24/2013
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Survey from QAYN2012, 39 pages

Over the past four years, the West and Central Africa sub-regions have seen a rapidly growing flame of controversy, political debates and media attention on questions related to the existence, identities and rights of sexual minority. Most notably, recent cases in Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Senegal and Cameroon, have served as a catalyst for debates and increased visibility of the realities of this population. However, very little data exists on this community.

This research enriches the “library” of data on the realities of LGBTI in Africa, “library” that has started to be built across the continent. For instance, in researches conducted in countries such as Cameroon, Morocco, Nigeria and Senegal, it was highlighted how the question of homosexuality is increasingly becoming a problematic one. One the other hand, these researches also show how it is becoming more and more challenging for African politicians to declare without reservation that homosexuality is “un-African”, since the respondents of these research projects are African, living on the continent who have voluntarily taken part in the studies, despite the social and political context in their countries.

Struggling alone: The Lived Realities of Women who have sex with Women in Burkina Faso, Ghana and Nigeria Struggling alone: The Lived Realities of Women who have sex with Women in Burkina Faso, Ghana and Nigeria

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Date added: 05/24/2013
Date modified: 07/01/2015
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Struggling Alone2012, 46 pages.

From April to August 2011, QAYN conducted a five-month research project in Burkina Faso, Ghana and Nigeria, in order to critically document the lived realities of lesbians, bisexuals, transgendered, queer and women who have sex with women. QAYN worked in Ghana and Burkina Faso, while QAYN’s local partner in Nigeria, Women’s Health and Equal Rights (WHER), undertook the same process in Nigeria. A group of volunteers engaged in interviews and focus group discussions to uncover the challenges faced and strategies used by LBTQWSW in living their lives as same gender-loving women. This research project was the first of its kind to be designed and conducted by a pan-African lesbian-led group in West Africa.

As this report demonstrates, LBTQWSW in West Africa remain some of the most marginalized, vulnerable, invisible members of the LGBTQQ community in the sub-region. Often out of sight, they live within a patriarchal social system and narrowed interpretations of what forms of identity, expression and relationships are morally acceptable. These women exist; their lives and struggles are real – and deserved to be documented.

Customary Law and its impact in Botswana Customary Law and its impact in Botswana

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Date added: 05/24/2013
Date modified: 05/24/2013
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Botswana customary law2013, 8 pages

Botswana has a dual judicial system, one based on customary law and the other on a combination of English and Roman-Dutch law (‘received law’). Both legal systems are used by people in Botswana
and have courts established to adjudicate on matters between parties. This paper seeks to discuss customary law as practiced in Botswana and its impact on the equal rights of women and men, women’s rights, children and Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, Transsexuals and Intersexed (LGBTI) people.

The paper will also briefly discuss the parallel judicial systems in other Southern African Legal Assistance Network (SALAN) member states as well as the work which DITSHWANELO (www.ditshwanelo.org.bw) does in the field of customary law.

A Sierra Leonean case study A Sierra Leonean case study

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Date added: 05/23/2013
Date modified: 05/23/2013
Filesize: 1.05 MB
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Sierra Leone 20132013, 43 pages.

Discrimination on the Basis of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity
in Access to Health Care and Violence/Bias.

This report is the compilation of two research projects initiated in 2012 as part of the Global Rights’ project, Increasing the Capacity of Sierra Leonean LGBTI Civil Society Organizations to Monitor, Document and Address Rights Violations in their Communities. This is the first report on discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity in Sierra Leone and represents a concerted effort by our partners Dignity Association and Pride Equality, whose knowledge and understanding of the unique challenges faced when collecting information in the local LGBTI community, allowed them to uncover data that could not have been collected otherwise.

Guilty by Association Guilty by Association

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Date added: 04/11/2013
Date modified: 04/11/2013
Filesize: 770.11 kB
Downloads: 2040

The 55-page report from March 2013 presents 10 case studies of arrests and prosecutions under article 347 bis of Cameroon’s penal code, which punishes “sexual relations between persons of the same sex” with up to five years in prison.

The report found that most people charged with homosexuality are convicted based on little or no evidence. The report includes numerous cases in which the law against homosexual conduct was used for settling scores, showing how the law is easily subject to abuse. Dozens of Cameroonians do jail time solely because they are suspected of being gay or lesbian, the groups found.

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