Country Reports

Information on the conditions for LGBTI minorities in specific countries from global human rights organizations and other sources.

Documents

Order by : Name | Date | Hits [ Ascendant ]

My way, your way, or the right way? The Yogyakarta principles: a kenyan interpretation My way, your way, or the right way? The Yogyakarta principles: a kenyan interpretation

hot!
Date added: 06/11/2012
Date modified: 08/02/2012
Filesize: 2.11 MB
Downloads: 969

my_way_picture_2Rights Law and the LGBTI Community in Kenya (2010).

An interpretation of how the Yogyakarta principles are applicable in a Kenyan context including case stories of LGBTI people. The GKT (Gay Kenyan trust) has reformulated the legal language of the Yogyakarta principles into a language that is easy for every Kenyan to understand. The result is a simple and clear explanatiion of what LGBTI rights are. That they are neither "Special Rights", nor "New Rights". They are basic human rights. GKT urges the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNCHR) to endorse the Yogyakarta Principles and/or this local presentation of the Principles in public forums and to sponsor training and awareness?raising activities.

Pambazuka: Pan-African News on LGBT Pambazuka: Pan-African News on LGBT

hot!
Date added: 06/11/2012
Date modified: 08/02/2012
Filesize: Unknown
Downloads: 1235
Pambazuka News offers news, analyses and debate on LGBTI issues in Africa. Produced by a pan-African community of academics, policy makers, social activists, commentators and others, it is an influential web forum for social justice in Africa. Pambazuka News also publishes podcasts, videocasts and books.

Looking at Sida work in Kenya from a sexuality angle Looking at Sida work in Kenya from a sexuality angle

hot!
Date added: 06/11/2012
Date modified: 08/02/2012
Filesize: 375.39 kB
Downloads: 1264

An evaluation report on how Sida (Swedish International Development Agency) addresses its commitments related to sexuality in Kenya (2007).

Sida interviewed people who were a part of their development programmes. Page 5 lists the questions asked, with special focus on how taking up a discussion and ensuing actions on sexuality can lead to better programming and eventually improved wellbeing and quality of life. The report also describes how areas which are not obviously connected to sexual rights, such as agriculture and infrastructure, also have taken significant steps to address sexuality issues in relation to HIV/AIDS and gender and other cross cutting issues. The evaluation report ends with a list of recommendations (page 11).

“We’ll show you you’re a woman” “We’ll show you you’re a woman”

Date added: 06/07/2012
Date modified: 08/02/2012
Filesize: Empty
Downloads: 32

Violence and discrimination against black lesbians and transgender men in South Africa (2011).

The constitution of South Africa in 1996 was the first in the world to include provisions of non-discrimination based on sexual orientation, however LGBT people in South Africa continue to face hostility and violence.

South_Africa_Human_Rights_Watch_-_coverSocial surveys demonstrate a wide gap between the ideals of the constitution and public attitudes toward such individuals. Negative public attitudes towards homosexuality go hand in hand with a broader pattern of discrimination, violence, hatred, and extreme prejudice against people known or assumed to be LGBT or those who violate gender and sexual norms in appearance or conduct (such as women playing soccer, dressing in a masculine manner, and refusing to date men). Constitutional protections are greatly weakened by the state’s failure to adequately enforce them.

This report documents discrimination and abuse against black lesbians, transgender men, and individuals who, while born female, do not conform to feminine gender norms and expectations. These individuals and groups experience discrimination, harassment, and violence at the hands of private individuals and sometimes state agents. HRW stress that the South African government has to take immediate steps to honor its promise of equality, non-discrimination, and a life of dignity for lesbians, gay men, and bisexual and transgender people; failing to do so betrays the constitution, imperiling the rights of all South Africans.

We are a buried generation. Discrimination and violence against sexual minorities in Iran We are a buried generation. Discrimination and violence against sexual minorities in Iran

hot!
Date added: 06/07/2012
Date modified: 08/02/2012
Filesize: 670.39 kB
Downloads: 992

Human Rights Watch Report (2010) documenting discrimination and violence against LGBT persons in Iran.

We_are_buried_generationHuman Rights Watch analyzed these abuses within the context of systematic human rights violations perpetrated by the Iranian government against its citizens generally, including arbitrary arrests and detentions, invasions of privacy, mistreatment, torture of detainees, and the lack of due process and fair trial standards. HRW calls on the Iranian government to abolish the laws and other legislation under the Islamic Penal Code that criminalize consensual same-sex conduct, especially those that impose the death penalty, and to cease the harassment, arrest, detention, prosecution, and conviction of LGBT persons or persons who engage in consensual same-sex conduct.

At least the report calls on other states and the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees to implement policies and recommendations to safeguard the rights of Iran’s vulnerable LGBT refugees and asylum seekers.

LGBTnet is developed by LGBT Denmark and The Danish Family Planning Association, Danish Refugee Council & Sabaah • Contact:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.